Innovation Sensation!

Technological Advances Strike SDJA

By Ariela Moel (‘22)

 

Hidden below the old library area in the school’s A building secretly lies a little-known gem of  San Diego Jewish Academy. This beneficial learning environment boasts abundant technology and holds the key to innovation. What is this incognito luxury? The virtual reality lab! Even though it is relatively unknown now, students will soon become more familiar with the technological wonderland that SDJA has to offer. 

Mr. Kwaku Aning, director of the school’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking (CIET), gave students new opportunities when his lab debuted in 2018, and again when he developed a new station located in the art room which followed it the next year. Both labs give students the ability to draw, create, and learn through artificial intelligence and augmented reality. Sophomore Rena Novom (‘22), has recently joined an art class in which she uses the VR. Rena mentions that VR lets her “manipulate the art form more than in a real-life situation.” 
VR Lab #1

Mr. Aning’s captivating VR Station, full of opportunities for SDJA’s students. Picture by Ariela Moel (‘22)

And this is only a small percentage of the enhancements SDJA has developed since the beginning of this school year. Other than the wonders which the virtual reality lab brings to the community, there have been other modifications made to the robotics team, classes added to the MS and HS curricula, and a newly established MS robotics program. As Jessie Gan (‘21), co-captain, along with Noah Katcher (’20), of the “7609 Lions” robotics team, mentions, the team has recently “taken advantage of the 3D printers.”  She notes that “now, more people on the team have those marketable 3D printing skills needed for our robotics use.”

Though unknown to many students, the VR labs are a school treasure. Whether it comes to building a 3D art model in Google Tilt Brush, an application made specifically for painting in new perspectives, or simply playing a game, students are allowed to see the unique window of high tech that is the VR.

Anyone interested in visiting one of the labs simply has to reach out to him. As Mr. Aning mentions, “We have several headsets (wired and wireless) and students can always email me if they would like to meet me during POD to try it out and explore how it works.”  

As if this VR station were not enough, Ms. Nebo has created a second VR lab, this one located in the art studio. When asked how it has improved SDJA’s art department, Ms. Nebo explains that “In the visual art class, we start off with a lot of paper and pencil and painting, kind of the more traditional art techniques and I think a lot of kids are intimidated by that because they don’t think of themselves as artists, and I feel like the VR gives them a different way to be able to express themselves.” With the implementation of the Occulus Quest, a type of VR headset, Ms. Nebo and her students have been able to benefit from the wireless technology.

VR Lab #2
Ms. Nebo’s new virtual reality headset which helps create student masterpieces. Picture by Ariela Moel (‘22)

Although virtual reality is exciting, it is not the only type of innovation at SDJA. “I think that when you challenge kids, you challenge students to try something new, and there’s a camaraderie that comes out of that,” says Mr. Marc Muroff, the AP Computer Science Principles teacher. When asked what innovations he has seen this year at SDJA, he responded, “I think SDJA offering two middle school programming classes and a full-year robotics class is very innovative.” Most people have generalized the word ‘innovation’ to be strictly technological, yet this isn’t so. As Mr. Muroff suggests, innovations can include allowing young students to take a leap into the world of experimental thinking in class and in the outside world.

The leaders in CIET have recently implemented a few new technologies at SDJA. After being asked about the upcoming projects or ideas for the school, Mr. Aning mentioned a new innovation center. “The plans are to create a space here on campus where students can conceive, create, and present new innovations in addition to incorporating these innovation skills into their school work,” he states.

Luckily, SDJA’s faucet of technology doesn’t stop running there. As well as the innovation center, there have been many new components in CIET. “I have seen a lot of amazing things this year!” Mr. Aning exclaims. “This include kindergarten students using AR to share their research about young activists with their parents, 5th-grade students using AI to develop adaptive solutions for people with disabilities, and high school students researching escape rooms to learn about film making, storytelling, and math,” 

The many opportunities that SDJA offers its students are nothing short of sensational. As Ms. Alicia Johal, CIET assistant director, mentions, “Teachers and students across campus have done some amazing work to embed innovative teaching practices into their curriculum. I have been excited by all of it – augmented reality experiences, virtual reality, robotics, creative video productions, podcasting, coding, and more!”

So many cutting edge additions to the school in such a short time confirm San Diego Jewish Academy as an authentic innovation sensation. As SDJA continues thinking creatively, the school community can look forward to even more progress and improvements in the near future. Stay tuned!

 

Jazzing Things Up

The SDJA music program gives a new spin on old school programming, and introduces students to new views on the art form
By Ron Gneezy (‘21)

 

Kab Shab Band 2019-2020

The Advanced Music class, spearheaded by Rabbi Frank and Mr. Collins, with help from Mr. Kahn, performs arrangements of classic Jewish songs at Kabbalat Shabbat. Photo by Rosie Alchalel (’21)

 

Since the beginning of the 2019-20 school year, the music program — especially the Advanced Music class — has grown both its presence on campus and its influence on the student body vastly. It’s practically a different entity compared to itself in previous years.

One big change is the rejuvenated presence of singers in the Advanced Music class. When asked about her history with the class, Sivan Gabai (‘23) stated, “I started Advanced Music this year,” and the story is the same for every singer.

With a constantly changing student body, bringing in new students is important for making sure the music program thrives. Mr. Collins has been teaching for, by his own account, “around fifteen years,” so he’s seen much of the program’s evolution.

Some students currently in the program have been participants since well before they entered high school, such as accomplished trumpeter Charles Simons (‘21), who, “started actually… playing the trumpet in 5th grade.” No matter when they joined the program, though, the goal for Mr. Collins remains the same: to make sure that, “as [the students’] musical ability gets better and they get more comfortable playing with other people, that they’re able to communicate through the music,” adding that, “improvisation is really the ultimate goal.”

Many students have greatly appreciated this direction of teaching, such as Devin Marcus (‘21), who says that, compared to when he was playing mostly by himself, “knowing that the other instruments are there to accompany me and what I can do is really fun, and I enjoy playing with them because they can also teach you a lot more about how to work in a group.”

The biggest change for the music program this year, though, is the integration of the Advanced Music class into the brand new Kabbalat Shabbat programming. The weekly repetition of these performances has played into their evolution, with Sivan Gabai saying that, “singing in front of the entire group at Kabbalat Shabbat has just become, y’know, more like a routine, so not necessarily as big as a performance.” This is key for that comfort in playing that Mr. Collins is seeking.

In addition to furthering Mr. Collins’ goal of teaching students the valuable skill of improvisation, the Kabbalat Shabbat involvement is a massive part of Rabbi Frank’s ultimate plan for the Friday programming. The Rabbi’s goal since day one has been, “to get kids up on the stage with us, not only playing music, but ultimately my vision is that all of the staff are gonna be very far in the background. The kids are gonna be taking ownership for introducing the various Brachot, candle lighting, Mi Shebeirach, and so forth, and giving Drashot instead of me.” The musicians’ involvement is just the first part of this.

Everywhere on campus, the impact of the music program is increasing at a breakneck pace. As more students get involved in events and performances around the school — from showcase night to open mics — the general capability increases, with members from the seasoned students to the fresh blood learning nonstop. Hopefully, this trend continues for years to come.

What a Non-Movie-Lover Loved About Ford v. Ferrari

Movie Review by Rosie Alchalel (’21)

Ford-v-Ferrari(109)

The Hollywood racing extravaganza won two Oscars, for Best Film Editing and Best Sound Editing. (Reproduced under Fair Use Copyright Act).

 

I’m not the biggest movie fan. Typically, going to the theaters translates into nap time for me, and movies tend to feel like a complete waste of time. Nor am I the biggest car aficionado. I can’t tell you that I understand the car craze nor the typical teenager’s craving for speed.

But I can tell you that I enjoyed Ford v. Ferrari

Not because it is a cinematic masterpiece–Ford v. Ferrari is definitely not that. It is clearly a movie formulated for the big screen, with every minute of it screaming Hollywood. I enjoyed it because it is a film made for everyone, not exclusively for car fanatics nor only for cinephiles. It truly is a movie that everyone in the audience will find worthwhile.

Why? Because it tells a human story. Because it evokes human feelings. 

Christian Bale Press Conference for Ford v. Ferrari

Ford v. Ferrari star Christian Bale takes a selfie with a fan during the film’s premiere. (Public domain).

 

Halfway through the movie it finally resonates with race car driver Ken Miles (Christian Bale) that the 24 Hours at Le Mans are not about speed at all; instead, they are all about perseverance. He realizes that they are about the racer’s ability, or inability, to keep moving for 24 hours and not simply about getting from Point A to Point B. The same can be said about the movie itself. It is not about portraying a series of events efficiently, moreover, it is about conveying the feelings felt by both auto racer and engineer Caroll Shelby (Matt Damon) and Ken Miles leading up to, and during, the race itself. 

And there sure are a lot of feelings. 

For one, there is a whole lot of frustration. Some towards Ferrari, some towards Ken Miles, and a whole lot towards Ford. (Just wait until the end of the race, you’ll see what I’m talking about.)

Of course, the audience also experiences a thrill any time a racetrack is involved

But there’s also a whole lot of love, apparent in the adorable relationship between Miles and his son Peter (Noah Jupe), in the romantic relationship between Miles and his wife Mollie (Caitriona Balfe), and in the unlikely friendship that develops between Miles and Shelby. 

And the best part of all is that these feelings are not simply found on-screen. Magically, perhaps due to the exceptional acting, they jump out at the audience and suddenly, you are rooting for Ford in the same way that you root for your favorite sports team during a playoff game. 

Excitingly, this win was never guaranteed, and Shelby preaches this. He goes as far as telling Ford that, “you can’t buy a win, but you can buy the guy who can give you a shot,” referring to Ken Miles, who although being thought of as “difficult to work with,” is given a second chance by Ford. Whether this ends up being a good or bad move, you will have to see for yourself on the big screen.

In all, Ford v. Ferrari is not just for the car lover who walked into the theater knowing exactly what happened at the Le Mans race of 1966. Nor is it just for movie fans in general. It is also for those who had no idea that Le Mans existed until they watched the trailer. 

This movie truly is for everyone, and that is why it worked for me. 

 

Lion-ing Up for Lunch

New MUS Cafe and Lunch Area Spark Gustatory Adventures 

By Alexandra Wellman (’23)

Standing in line to purchase hot lunch, Jessica Podolsky (‘20) tries to peek through the swarm of people to see what’s on the menu, ready to get her hands on the day’s meal. “I love how convenient it is to get lunch here,”  Jessica states, adding how “ it’s not only easy to just swing by and pick it up but it’s also delicious.”

This year the SDJA hot-lunch has had a major influx of hungry customers. Why? Because, thanks to the new Lion’s Cafe, the lunch experience has been changed for the better.

In past years, students had to walk from the upper school to the lower school playground to pick up their hot lunches. This process took precious time out of students’ short break. Upon arriving at SDJA, Executive Chef Giselle Wellman, took it upon herself to change the hot lunch experience in the Maimonides Upper School.  Just two years later, the Lion’s Café opened to the hungry Lions in the upper school. 

The new Lions Café was the perfect solution to students’ lunch problems.

However, the success of the Lion’s Cafe has not come without hardship. The new café brought the challenge of more students coming in to receive lunch every day. “I’m a lot busier this year moving food from one kitchen to the other but it feels great to be able to feed more people,” Giselle Wellman shared. 

With the shortened wait time and easy access to the café, more students choose to buy lunch. However, the increase of students has made it harder to keep track of each person who walked in the door. The solution? Each student now has a PIN number which they type into a computer before selecting their meal. 

Which, of course, brings its own technological difficulties. 

Although it may sound simple, memorizing a PIN number does not top the list for most students. Mrs. Anna Falkiewicz, MUS Dean of Students, who helps out at the Lions Café every day, expressed that it was definitely frustrating at first to have to remind students of their PIN every day. Despite the difficulties, every student who remembers their PIN number means faster food for everyone else. 

Although there have been some twists and turns along the way, there is one thing the Lions Café has definitely done right–the food! For example, students all know that Wednesdays are pizza days, lining up ahead of time pouring in as soon as lunch starts. 

When asked about past meals she has enjoyed at the Lions’ Café, Noa Rosenbaum (’23) says, “I am never disappointed by the food. Regardless of what is served, it is always delicious.” 

Bringing the school healthy lunches has been the main goal for the Lions Café. Ms. Wellman explains that, “Just because it tastes good doesn’t mean it has to be unhealthy. I always try to incorporate fruits, vegetables, and healthy ingredients into the lunches for the students.” One of the delicious meals that exhibits this perfectly is a campus favorite: butternut squash macaroni and cheese. “Yes! It’s mac and cheese day” students excitedly whisper in class rooms, hallways, and all around school. Diego Kohan (’22), already excited for the next one, says “I honestly never knew it had butternut squash! I think it’s great to know that the delicious lunch that I eat all the time is good for me, too.”

 

Eitan Breziner and Chicken Fingers

Eitan Breziner (’20) savors every bite of his chicken fingers and potato wedges . 

Photo by Alexandra Wellman (’23)

The Lions’ Café is not the only recent addition to the SDJA lunch experience; students are also making good use out of the handsome new tables, a welcome replacement for some of the old worn out tables. These new brown wooden tables have improved the ambiance of students’ lunch time experience. “The tables added a sense of community to SDJA, since some of the new tables are bigger they’ve allowed more people to sit together.” Kate Aizin (‘22) shares.

SDJA is experiencing a new lunch-time dynamic. Bringing hot, healthy, and delicious lunches to the MUS, and adding new, unifying tables and a more efficient delivery system has sparked an eating renaissance on campus. What delicious item will you have for lunch tomorrow at the Lions Café?

A Living Legacy: Juan Suaste

Long-time SDJA staff member looks back on his time at the school 

By Talia Gold (‘20)

Juan Suaste (Jan 2020)

Juan Suaste photographed by Talia Gold (‘20)

When speaking of Juan Suaste, there is no person– staff, student, or parent– in the school community who doesn’t have something fond to say about him. His entrance into a room never goes unnoticed thanks to his loud, unabashed, “Shalom, Shalom,” announcing to everyone that he has arrived. 

“Juan learned how to say hello in like six different languages so that he can greet every student in their native language,” comments English teacher Sara Hansen fondly. “I think that’s really special.”

Throughout the course of our conversation, it became clear that Juan’s comfort and relationship with the students at SDJA had progressed over the years. He quickly recalled multiple memories of his interactions with them. Singing like mariachis with the graduating senior class, joking with students, making up silly names for them–the stories went on and on. 

His relationship with the students, beyond friendly joking, has played a big part in his learning Hebrew. Working in a place where students were learning a language he didn’t know sparked his interest in learning the language himself. With determination, Juan learned small phrases like “Shalom,” “Ma Shlomech,” “Boker Tov,” and “Sababa.” This small handful of phrases proved to be substantial enough to hold a minor conversation with the Hebrew teachers when he walked into their classroom. Juan fondly mentioned all of the students who helped him learn Hebrew.

As a main member of the school’s marvelous maintenance crew, Juan’s responsibility for keeping the campus clean, well-maintained, and looking sharp is endless; he often seems to be in several places at once. If someone were to say, “it’s almost like he lives here,” Juan would say, “I do.” Juan not only works at San Diego Jewish Academy, he also calls it his home, for real. Situated above the tennis courts, Juan’s house provides a spot from where he can watch over the campus he cares for so deeply, morning, noon, and night. 

Se siente un poco de responsabilidad por vivir aquí (There is a certain sense of responsibility that comes with living here),” shares Juan. “Cualquier problema pues anteriormente tenía que levantarme a chequar cosas ya, ahora ya como los últimos años hasta la fecha que han puesto mucha seguridad y todo, pero pues está bien. Osea que es conveniente para ellos y para mi que alguien esté viviendo en la escuela (Before, any problem that arose, I’d have to get up and go check it out. Now, the updated security makes things easier. It’s both convenient for me and the guards to have me here. We rely on each other).”

But Juan’s job isn’t his only priority. What many people don’t know is that he also spends time working on and improving his ranch in his hometown of Guanajuato, Mexico. 

“Soy dueño de un rancho que mide por ahí de cuatro acres y tengo mi propio negocio vendiendo pipas de agua ahí. (I own a ranch that’s about four acres in size, and I run a little business there selling water pipes).” Whenever he gets the chance to go home, which is about every two months, Juan says he works on further developing his ranch which is home to cows and sheep and his two dogs.

However, Juan doesn’t just go home to improve his ranch. His contributions to bettering the community extend past the gates of the San Diego Jewish Academy and travel with him to Guanajuato, where he hopes to make life in the small town a little better.

Hago cosas para mi pueblo (I do things to help my town). Ahorita tengo un club de emigrantes de mi pueblo que hemos hecho cosas para ayudar. Lo último que estamos acabando es que abrimos una escuela de música y nosotros hacemos rifas para poder hacer dinero y comprar instrumentos para los niños (I’m a part of a club with other immigrants from my town and together we raise money to help fund things there. The last thing we raised money for was a music school we opened for the kids who live in our town. We got money doing raffles and other fundraisers and as of now have been able to buy instruments for the kids to use).

If one asks Juan about his future plans, he will gush about his dream to move back to Mexico, his voice filled with longing to be reunited with his six brothers and their families. 

Cuando me retire, pienso irme a gozar mi ranchito aya con mi esposa en México, andar en caballo, cuidar mis borregas, mi burro, y trabajar un poco con mis trabajos que hago aya (When I retire, I plan to move back to my ranch with my wife, ride my horses, look after my sheep and donkey, and work more actively with my projects there.)” 

Nada es eterno, pero los mejores de mis años han sido aquí (Nothing lasts forever, but I can say that my best years have been here).

Juan’s time here has been very well spent. Having built a relationship with his coworkers and community, including parents, students, and staff, Juan has become a man no one can pass by without smiling. In his 22 years at our campus, he has worked his way into the hearts of everyone who visits our school. It truly wouldn’t be SDJA without Juan.

It’s a Family Affair

An inside look at the SDJA family through the eyes of new teachers

By Ella Diamond (‘20) and Sammi Weiss (‘23)

 

It’s 2:00 pm on a Friday. There are still 45 minutes left to go in Rabbi Frank’s senior seminar class, but instead of staring at the clock waiting for the weekend to start, the entire senior seminar class sits engrossed in a debate about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 

Rabbi David Frank, the new Chief Rabbi at the San Diego Jewish Academy, incorporates heated debates into his teaching style–a technique that has proven beneficial for students at SDJA. One reason Rabbi Frank accepted his position at SDJA was because he wanted to teach in this inclusive manner that allows students to feel at home. Why? Because SDJA is not just a school but a family that prides itself on making students feel this way, even in the classroom. 

“The administration puts their heart into what they’re doing,” Rabbi Frank says, sharing an insight he learned from having watched all three of his children go from kindergarten through 12th grade here. Coming to work here gave him the feeling of a homecoming, allowing him to find his place in the SDJA family once more.

Rabbi Frank (Jan 2020)

Rabbi Frank pauses from planning the school’s weekly Kabbalat Shabbat. 

Photo: Sammi Weiss (‘23)

Rabbi Jacobson, another new face in the Judaica department, also came to SDJA because of the family feel. She has taught at several day schools across the country but none of them, she says, are like SDJA. “This is the first school [where I’ve been] that encourages students to ask questions,” Rabbi Jacobson says, recalling the Jewish values she grew up with, which encourages curiosity. She believes that by asking many questions, students feel a part of the teaching process and are encouraged to take a greater interest in their learning. 

Rabbi Jacobson (Jan 2020)
Rabbi Jacobson preparing to answer her students’ questions during POD. 

Photo: Ella Diamond (‘20) and Sammi Weiss (‘23)

Other fresh faces at the school include Mr. David Sered, the newest history teacher and his daughter, Ms. Allie Sered, a teacher’s assistant in the Golda Meir Lower School. This father-daughter pair have really taken the idea of SDJA as a family to heart. Mr. Sered explains that, “everybody here is very much a part of the community, and people are invested in each other.” Compared to the other schools where he has previously taught, including a Catholic school in Los Angeles, Mr. Sered appreciates the fact that SDJA is open to using conversational methods in the classroom; he believes that giving the class a sense of freedom allows students to feel heard and pushes them to learn even more.  

David Sered & Ally Sered (Jan 2020)

The fabulous father-daughter duo, Mr. David Sered and Ms. Allie Sered. 

Photo: Ella Diamond (‘20) and Sammi Weiss (‘23)

Similarly, Dr. Perry Strahl, the school’s newest resident mathematics expert, has also found the tight-knit family environment at SDJA to be “super friendly.” Coming from UCSD where he taught in a huge lecture hall filled with over 400 students, Dr. Strahl feels like the small classes here are a breath of fresh air. He appreciates the school’s “resources and motivated student body,” because they allow him to truly pass on his knowledge and help students with their individual needs. After only one semester of classes, he says, SDJA already feels like home. 

Perry Strahl (Jan 2020)

The smiling Dr. Strahl at home in his element.  Photo: Sammi Weiss (‘23)

Regardless of where the new teachers came from, or how they got here, all agree that they have found comfort within the walls of SDJA. This can only happen in a school like SDJA; not the school, the family. 

 

Firewall Frustration

SDJA students speak out against Internet blocks on controversial websites 

By Gabriela Wellman (‘20)

 

Internet Firewall by Elizabeth Nebo

Illustration © Elizabeth Nebo (2019)

 

While searching for information for an assignment on Roe v. Wade, Galia Cohen (‘20) looked up plannedparenthood.com only to be met with the following message, “Your connection is not private, please navigate back to safety.” Shrugging it off, Cohen attempted to open the second hit from her Google search–‘abortion’–but once again, she encountered the same message redirecting her back to the main Google page. 

“It was so irritating,” Cohen explains. “Planned Parenthood is a way to access important information on issues you might not know well enough. The school’s WiFi prohibiting access to it felt like limiting our access to information.” 

Ana Gerson (‘21), a student in AP U.S. Government who faced the same impediment as Cohen, says, “It made me feel outraged and confused. I feel like by blocking access for students on that website, the school is trying to influence us into believing something we don’t necessarily believe.”

Similar to AP U.S Government, Judaism and the Body, and Jewish Ethics are classes that push the boundaries of traditional classroom topics. Just like with Cohen’s and Gerson’s experiences with Planned Parenthood, students in these classes were asked to do school-sponsored research and were also surprised to find that websites containing sensitive information were blocked by the SDJA WiFi’s Firewall. 

“As a parent, especially thinking of middle school students, I would want to know that they have the freedom to be on the Internet while safety features are in place,” History Department Chair, Mrs. Susan Wu adds, “But I do not understand the block on Planned Parenthood.”

Dean of Students, Mrs. Anna Falkiewicz agrees that the block, specifically on this website, sends a negative message to pro-choice individuals, making them believe that this is not something our community supports, which, she clarifies, is not the intention. 

Of course, it is understandable that parameters must be put in place in order to ensure that students navigate safely and resourcefully on the school WiFi, but, based on conversations with students and teachers, there seems to be an overarching request to widen those parameters. 

Gali Laska (‘20) thinks that “these parameters are valid, to a certain extent. There are some websites, for example, those which include inappropriate information or photos, that should not be able to be reached under school WiFi, but anything containing valuable information to students should not be blocked.”

But, the school’s WiFi firewall raises some questions: What is being blocked? And why? 

Mrs. Sara Hansen, English Department Chair, describes how every year she demonstrates to students her ability to freely access Martinlutherking.org, a website whose name sounds credible but is actually owned by the KKK. How is it that such sites can be visited, but truly informative ones, such as plannedparenthood.com are blocked?

The Lion’s Den decided to reach out to the school’s IT Director, Mr. Chris Hill, to find out more about the firewall and how the restriction might be used more effectively. Apparently, SDJA’s firewall works by identifying and flagging certain words or phrases, such as ‘drugs,’ and ‘sex,’ and blocking out websites that includes those red-flags. 

“[It blocks] any standard sites that aren’t appropriate for kids or employees at work,” Hill clarifies. But, regardless of how this block happens, many students can agree that widening the parameters on technology would enhance their learning experience. 

Jimmy Cohen (‘22) is among a number of students offering potential solutions and next steps toward fixing the block. “First and foremost, I think that [plannedparenthood.com] has to be unblocked immediately,” Cohen says. “I also think that, at the very least, we need to be provided with a list of approved websites for research, especially on these more controversial topics such as abortion and drugs.”

Another popular suggestion around campus is the idea of a ‘teacher override,’ a solution allowing students researching topics for a specific class to request access to blocked websites directly from their teachers. Teachers could then override the firewall’s system on those specific devices. Given the amount of student interest in improving Internet access, it remains to be seen what the solution may be.

Amidst the controversy, it is reassuring to hear that SDJA administration and the IT department are not seeking to steer students’ minds with any political bias.

Mrs. Falkiewicz reiterates the fact that, “SDJA values individuals’ own opinions on political issues and is, by no means, trying to formulate opinions for its students.” 

Hopefully the entire student body can look forward to a solution that fosters the use of the latest technology in their learning in a way that doesn’t expose them to distracting, and even harmful, information.